Programs 2015

LIPopCon2015 will be held on APRIL 16th, 2015
at the St. John’s University OAKDALE Campus.

Below is the list of tentative programs for the Long Island Libraries and Pop Culture Conference. Programming is subject to change.

Be a Summer Reading Club Hero!
9:45 AM – 10:45 AM
Speakers: Marie Drucker, Malverne Public Library; Ron Schachter, Westbury Memorial Public Library; Lissetty Thomas-Johnson, Brentwood Public Library

It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s…the 2015 Summer Reading Clubs! This time around the themes that are incredibly pop culture-friendly —  “Every Hero Has a Story” (Children), “Unmask!” (Teens), and “Escape the Ordinary” (Adults). That means there’s a lot that librarians can work with, from superheroes to hero protagonists in fantasy/dystopian/sci fi literature. This program will help attendees start planning for SRCs by highlighting appropriate pop culture materials and/or programs.

Gaming at Your Library
9:45 AM – 10:45 AM
Speakers: Pam Cora, New York Public Library; Josh Firer, Bellmore Memorial Library; James Hutter, Wesbury Memorial Public Library; Samantha Marker, Mt. Laurel Library

Board games, video games, live action role-playing games, card games, online games…there is a game out there for every interest and age group! A panel of gaming experts and enthusiasts will explain different gaming genres, discuss the latest and greatest games and how they can be used in an educational/library setting, as well as ponder the continued popularity of gaming that has resulted in such recent developments as Will Wheaton’s successful crowdfunded web series, Table Top.

Indie Comics, Web Comics, the Library, and You!
9:45 AM – 10:45 AM
Speakers: Alex Chautin, writer; Tim Ferrara, artist/writer; Sophie Goldstein, artist; Jenny McKeon, artist; Annie Stoll, writer

Web and Independent comics have grown in both number and importance over the past decade.  How can libraries connect to patrons through these materials? What methods and technologies are available to help libraries offer such materials to patrons?  How can libraries foster potential web or independent creators in their communities?

Legitimizing Fan Comics and Fanfiction:
The Transition from Fan Work to Traditional Publication
9:45 AM – 10:45 AM
Speakers: Bill Burns, Suffolk County Community College; Andrea Graham, Northport-East Northport Public Library; Marissa Lieberman, East Orange Public Library; Nola Thacker, Westhampton Free Library; Clive Young, author

Fanfiction and fan comics have many forms: from traditionally published fanfic, such as Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, to fairy tale adaptations found in Vertigo’s Fables and Zenescope’s Grimm Fairy Tales comic book series to comic book continuations of fan-favorite television series, such as Buffy and Angel, to the arrival of Fifty Shades of Grey via fanfic. Panelists will examine the role of fanfiction and fan comics and how they are making the transition from fan stories to legitimized published works.

Visual Literacy & Comics: Turning Kids and Teens into Eager Readers
9:45 AM – 10:45 AM
Speaker: William “Brimstone” Kucmierowski, Hound Comics

As librarians and teachers, it’s easy to forget that not everyone loves reading the way we do. In fact the road to reading proficiency and enjoyment is not always a smooth one for many young people. Join this book talk and discussion that focuses on comics as a transition tool for reluctant readers and kids who think they don’t have the time for books.

Accessing Anime and Managing Manga in Libraries and Classrooms
11:00 AM – 12:00 Noon
Speakers: Mike Buono, Patchogue-Medford Library; Josh Firer, Bellmore Memorial Library; Claudia McGivney, Dowling College; Laura Pope Robbins, Dowling College; Gloria Romano, Elmont Memorial Library

There’s a lot of anime and manga out there.  But how do we know what’s appropriate, what to teach with, what people would like?  How can librarians purchase manga and anime using patron requests, professional resources, and fandom websites, just to name a few? Let’s have a discussion on the many anime and manga series out there and how to incorporate them into the classroom (K-12 and higher education), as well as promote/recommend them for library patrons!

Celebrating Fandoms (with Limited Resources)
11:00 AM – 12:00 Noon
Speakers: N.C. Chris Couch, University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Andrea Graham, Northport-East Northport Public Library; Marissa Lieberman, East Orange Public Library; Samantha Marker, Mt. Laurel Library

Think your library, school, or business is too small, underfunded, or understaffed to make supporting pop culture possible? Think again! Learn how you can meet the educational and/or information needs of fans, while having fun and being frugal.

English Language Learners and Adult Emergent Readers:
Using Comics to Promote Literacy

11:00 AM – 12:00 Noon
Speakers: Ralph Guiteau, Syosset Public Library, Ron Schachter, Westbury Memorial Public Library; Lissetty Thomas-Johnson, Brentwood Public Library; Dawn Wing, Suffolk County Community College

Graphic novels are not ‘light’ reading. On the contrary, they require and can enable readers to develop critical visual and verbal literacy skills. They are simply another format that provide enriching opportunities in many areas of learning. This presentation will show you just how and why. Librarians will discuss how graphic novel collections and programming can be used for outreach to new adult readers and English language learners at their libraries as a way to promote literacy.

More Than Mary Sue: Female Populations in Pop Culture
11:00 AM – 12:00 Noon
Speakers: Tim Ferrara, artist/writer; Sophie Goldstein, artist/writer; Natalie Korsavidis, Farmingdale Public Library; Annie Stoll, writer; Raina Telgemeier, writer/artist; Nola Thacker, Westhampton Free Library

Market research indicates almost 50% of comic book readers are female (and the increased lines at women’s bathrooms the comic cons seem to bear this out.) As women take on the roles of creators and heroines, libraries need to know how to keep up and part of that is knowing the who and what of this fan base. This panel will be a look at female characters, creators, and readers, as it tackles the past, present, and future of role of women in pop culture.

Reading Beyond the Panels:
Using Graphic Narratives to Discuss Social Justice Issues
11:00 AM – 12:00 Noon
Speaker: Caroline Fuchs, St. John’s University

Looking for a new way to engage your patrons and book-club members in an active dialogue on social justice issues? Learn how one academic librarian uses graphic novels to help inform discussions of “big picture” issues such as poverty, struggles with identity, racism, the immigrant experience, prejudice, and the effects of warfare. Ideas presented will be easily adaptable to various groups in a variety of settings. Attendees will be provided with a suggested graphic novel reading list, and some practical “how to” tips.

Gender Identity and Sexual Orientation in Fanfiction:
The Good, the Bad, and the Not-So-Ugly
2:45 PM – 3:45 PM
Speakers: Leanna Ladouceur, St. John’s Univeristy; Gabby Lee, St. John’s University; Kimberly Meyer, St. John’s University; Alison Mirabella, St. John’s University; Rachel Sferlazza, St. John’s University

This panel of active creators and consumers of fanfiction will discuss the prevalence of young people using fanfiction to explore gender identity and sexual orientation. Panelists will also share ideas on how library staff can make libraries safe(r) spaces for young adults using fanfiction to explore these aspects of their lives.

Graphic Novels: They ARE Real Books!
2:45 PM – 3:45 PM
Speakers: Alex Chautin, writer; N.C. Chris Couch, University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Caroline Fuchs, St. John’s University; Raina Telgemeier, writer/artist

Every librarian has had that parent who refuses to let his or her child pick up a comic or graphic novel. Or the adult who refuses to consider graphic novels because they are not proper literature. How do we change their minds and show them how fun, educational, and important this format can be? In this panel we will talk about how the comic format is more widely accepted in other counties, the ways this format is beneficial to reluctant readers or those with learning disabilities and what series can help encourage parents and adult readers to accept them.

The Image of Librarians and the Librarian’s Image
2:45 PM – 3:45 PM
Speakers: Rosemary Kiladitis, Queens Library; Natalie Korsavidis, Farmingdale Public Library; Emily Lauer, Suffolk County Community College; Claudia McGivney, Dowling College; Laura Pope Robbins, Dowling College; Susan Wood, Suffolk County Community College

Librarians are often portrayed in very interesting ways in books, comics, anime and popular culture.  From Discworld to Batgirl to Giles, Read or Die and Fullmetal Alchemist to The Mummy to It’s a Wonderful Life, librarians are subject to a number of stereotypes and interpretations. Preconceived notions by our patrons can also have an impact on their approach to librarians and library services.  Is this a positive image for librarians? How do we combat this, encourage it, influence it, take advantage of it?  This will also be a chance to add some more materials that feature librarians to your collection!

Let’s Create Comics: Drawing/Writing Basics for Librarians and Educators
2:45 PM – 3:45 PM
Speakers: Marguerite Dabaie, New York University; Dawn Wing, Suffolk County Community College

A hands-on workshop for librarians and educators who’d like to learn how to draw comics, plan out a comics project and maybe even facilitate a comics drawing workshop at your library/school! Pass on the fun and skills of visual storytelling to patrons/students, too! Inspiration and techniques from Lynda Barry’s book and course “What it is: Manually Shifting the Image” will be demonstrated among others!

The Perks of Being a Cosplayer
2:45 PM – 3:45 PM
Speakers: Pam Cora, New York Public Library; Walter Hillegas, Empire Saber Guild; Marissa Lieberman, East Orange Public Library; Jenny McKeon, artist

Cosplay promotes creativity, camaraderie, and can even evolve into community service and philanthropic pursuits. Come learn about this facet of fandom from local cosplayers, librarians, and educators, and find out how you can reach out to current cosplayers/costumers, as well as how to use cosplay to reach new patrons or engage students.

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